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diana b
Administrator
Posts: 280

On the Six Streets Facebook page, CCTV has attracted some attention - what are the best systems? is it the best way of cutting down on thefts from cars? what problems might there be? what does the law say on filming outside your property? do the police encourage CCTV?  etc

As a first step, I have contacted Rebecca Hudson and she has said that she has experience in guiding people on this topic. So Six Streets is going to pose some questions and then publicise the answers. Then it may be that people in the area decided that CCTV is a good route to go down and exert some consumer muscle by buying in bulk or ...



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February 11, 2017 at 7:28 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Daphne Thornhill
Member
Posts: 4

I'm thinking of having CCTV installed to cover my drive, so look forward to reading the questions and answers.  Daphne

February 13, 2017 at 7:23 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Ian
Member
Posts: 6

 

After our garage break-in CCTV is tempting, but I question its efficacy above a dummy camera or two. We all know what criminals on CCTV look like - indistinct images of a male in dark trousers and dark hoody pulled over their faces. Of little use except for the joy of watching some creep help themselves to your stuff.

 

We might invest in a system but a good quality one is expensive, many hundreds of pounds, and I think many installers are capable only of screwing the cameras on a wall, not helping you understand what security outcome you want to achieve. I recall professional systems I’ve used being poorly fitted and of limited use when it really mattered.

 

I think having CCTV recordings could be a bit unhealthy - am I really going to look at every bit of footage where movement was detected - there’d be a lot of cats doing their thing (you know, F,F,F..) to watch! Being on either side of a surveillance camera is damaging - I sense they can feed mistrust and paranoia, however legitimate the intention.

 

Anyway, the Information Commissioner’s Office has a useful section on home CCTV, which seems like a good place to start - see below:

From: https://ico.org.uk/for-the-public/cctv

 

Using CCTV on your property

CCTV used on your property will be exempt from the Data Protection Act unless you are capturing footage of individuals outside your property.

However, regardless of whether your CCTV system is exempt, the ICO recommends that you use CCTV in a responsible way to protect the privacy of others.

 

How can I use CCTV on my property responsibly?

The guiding principle throughout the deployment of your CCTV equipment should be checking at each stage that its use is necessary and not disproportionate. For example – ask yourself:

• Do I really need a camera to address my security concerns?

• Would extra lighting or sensor lighting be as effective?

• Is there an alternative to a camera?

• Is there anyone who could advise me about alternatives?

• What is the most privacy friendly way to set it up?

• Can I avoid intruding into my neighbours’ property?

What if my camera captures footage of individuals beyond the boundaries of my property?

You must consider whether it is necessary for your camera to operate beyond the boundary of your property.

If your camera covers, even partially, any areas beyond the boundaries of your property, such as neighbouring gardens or the street, then it will no longer be exempt from the Data Protection Act (DPA) under the domestic purposes exemption. This does not mean that you are breaching the DPA but it does mean that you might need to take some steps to comply with it.

 

What can I do to make sure that what I’m doing complies with the DPA?

First, think about the problem you are trying to address and the best solution to it. This will usually be to safeguard you and your property against crime. Check your local police advice about crime prevention. Better locks or security lighting may be a more effective and less expensive way of securing your property.

 

If you decide to use CCTV cameras, you should:

• consider what areas would need to be covered by it, will the camera capture images you actually need and how you will safeguard any recorded images so they can be used by the police to investigate crimes affecting you;

• consider whether you can put up signs clearly explaining that recording is taking place and take steps to do so if it is practical;

• have appropriate safeguards in place to ensure that the equipment is only operated in the ways you intend and can’t be misused. At its simplest, this means that anyone you share your property with, such as family members who could use the equipment, need to know how important it is not to misuse it;

• ensure you have activated settings to enable the security of footage captured by the CCTV system and that any recordings of individuals are held securely. Make sure that you only allow access to people who need it;

• consider speaking to your neighbours and explain what you are doing and any objections or suggestions they have. (It may be useful to invite your neighbours to view the footage that you capture, this may allay any concerns they may have about your use of a CCTV system.); and

• consider purchasing equipment that enables you to control what you can record. This will enable you to keep privacy intrusion to a minimum.

You should remember that your use of a CCTV system may be appropriate but publicly uploading or streaming footage of individuals will require further justification and in most cases will not be justifiable.

 

As the data controller for this footage, individuals do have the right to request a copy of it from you under the DPA, if you collect their personal data.

 

What other considerations are there?

If you cannot rely on the domestic purposes exemption, you will need to register with us as a data controller.

Many CCTV systems now come with audio recording facilities. Audio recording is particularly privacy intrusive and in the vast majority of cases where CCTV is being used on domestic properties it should be disabled

 

After our garage break-in CCTV is tempting, but I question its efficacy above a dummy camera or two. We all know what criminals on CCTV look like - indistinct images of a male in dark trousers and dark hoody pulled over their faces. Of little use except for the joy of watching some creep help themselves to your stuff.

 

We might invest in a system but a good quality one is expensive, many hundreds of pounds, and I think many installers are capable only of screwing the cameras on a wall, not helping you understand what security outcome you want to achieve. I recall professional systems I’ve used being poorly fitted and of limited use when it really mattered.

 

I think having CCTV recordings could be a bit unhealthy - am I really going to look at every bit of footage where movement was detected - there’d be a lot of cats doing their thing (you know, F,F,F..) to watch! Being on either side of a surveillance camera is damaging - I sense they can feed mistrust and paranoia, however legitimate the intention.

 

Anyway, the Information Commissioner’s Office has a useful section on home CCTV, which seems like a good place to start - see below:

From: https://ico.org.uk/for-the-public/cctv

 

Using CCTV on your property

CCTV used on your property will be exempt from the Data Protection Act unless you are capturing footage of individuals outside your property.

However, regardless of whether your CCTV system is exempt, the ICO recommends that you use CCTV in a responsible way to protect the privacy of others.

 

How can I use CCTV on my property responsibly?

The guiding principle throughout the deployment of your CCTV equipment should be checking at each stage that its use is necessary and not disproportionate. For example – ask yourself:

• Do I really need a camera to address my security concerns?

• Would extra lighting or sensor lighting be as effective?

• Is there an alternative to a camera?

• Is there anyone who could advise me about alternatives?

• What is the most privacy friendly way to set it up?

• Can I avoid intruding into my neighbours’ property?

What if my camera captures footage of individuals beyond the boundaries of my property?

You must consider whether it is necessary for your camera to operate beyond the boundary of your property.

If your camera covers, even partially, any areas beyond the boundaries of your property, such as neighbouring gardens or the street, then it will no longer be exempt from the Data Protection Act (DPA) under the domestic purposes exemption. This does not mean that you are breaching the DPA but it does mean that you might need to take some steps to comply with it.

 

What can I do to make sure that what I’m doing complies with the DPA?

First, think about the problem you are trying to address and the best solution to it. This will usually be to safeguard you and your property against crime. Check your local police advice about crime prevention. Better locks or security lighting may be a more effective and less expensive way of securing your property.

 

If you decide to use CCTV cameras, you should:

• consider what areas would need to be covered by it, will the camera capture images you actually need and how you will safeguard any recorded images so they can be used by the police to investigate crimes affecting you;

• consider whether you can put up signs clearly explaining that recording is taking place and take steps to do so if it is practical;

• have appropriate safeguards in place to ensure that the equipment is only operated in the ways you intend and can’t be misused. At its simplest, this means that anyone you share your property with, such as family members who could use the equipment, need to know how important it is not to misuse it;

• ensure you have activated settings to enable the security of footage captured by the CCTV system and that any recordings of individuals are held securely. Make sure that you only allow access to people who need it;

• consider speaking to your neighbours and explain what you are doing and any objections or suggestions they have. (It may be useful to invite your neighbours to view the footage that you capture, this may allay any concerns they may have about your use of a CCTV system.); and

• consider purchasing equipment that enables you to control what you can record. This will enable you to keep privacy intrusion to a minimum.

You should remember that your use of a CCTV system may be appropriate but publicly uploading or streaming footage of individuals will require further justification and in most cases will not be justifiable.

 

As the data controller for this footage, individuals do have the right to request a copy of it from you under the DPA, if you collect their personal data.

 

What other considerations are there?

If you cannot rely on the domestic purposes exemption, you will need to register with us as a data controller.

Many CCTV systems now come with audio recording facilities. Audio recording is particularly privacy intrusive and in the vast majority of cases where CCTV is being used on domestic properties it should be disabled




February 21, 2017 at 8:08 AM Flag Quote & Reply

diana b
Administrator
Posts: 280
Social website Nextdoor Derby has cctv piccies of guy stealing from car near Darley Park. No hoodie but still not much chance of his mother being certain it is her little darling. Interested to see if it leads to arrest
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February 27, 2017 at 8:34 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Daphne Thornhill
Member
Posts: 4

CCTV - I've ony just seen your reply to my query, Ian.  Very many thanks.  I'm still investigating, but shall probably go ahead with an installation, as well as improved lighting.

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March 6, 2017 at 5:24 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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